Tiny Solar House Goes To Big Bend

Third stop on the solar powered tiny house tour across America was Big Bend National Park. Being that it was our first National Park, we were a little timid about running into some low tree limbs, but it turns out the roads cut through a park that is more of a desert than a forest.

We drove down from San Marcos following our Tiny Open House, and stopped at the Marathon RV park for the night, about 90 minutes outside of Big Bend.

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Located in Southwest Texas, Big Bend covers over 800,000 acres and is separated from the Mexican border by the Rio Grande River. The park exhibits dramatic contrasts and its climate may be characterized as one of extremes. Dry and hot late spring and summer days often exceed 100 °F in the lower elevations. Winters are normally mild but subfreezing temperatures occasionally occur. Because of the range in altitude from about 1,800 feet along the river to Emory Peak in the Chisos Mountains at 7,832 feet, a wide variation in available moisture and temperature exists throughout the park.

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We arrived at Big Bend National Park to a beautiful rainbow sunset, just as the rain was clearing.

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Our lodging for the week was the Rio Grande RV Park. Mountains surround the park on all sides, and constant winds and intermittent rain made staying here a unique experience. Luckily our SolarWorld solar panels remained tightly fastened throughout the week.

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During our stay at Big Bend we had the pleasure of visiting the Boquillas Canyon overlooking the Mexican town of Boquillas del Carmen, hiking the Lost Mine Trail on the Chisos Basin side of the park, enjoying the hot springs at night, checking out Santa Elena Canyon, and showing off our tiny house to a number of curious hikers, RVers, and residents of the park.

Pictures From The Lost Mine Trail

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Pictures From Boquillas Canyon

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Pictures From Boquillas del Carmen

Boquillas del Carmen is a colorful little town just outside the Texas/Mexico border. After showing our passports to the U.S. customs agents, we walked down the hill and paid $10 dollars to cross the Rio Grande via rowboat. An optional $5 dollar donkey ride took us up the 1 mile path into the town, and our first stop was Jose Falcones for some cheap Mexican food and cervasas.  Turns out the restaurant, street lights, and entire power grid throughout town was powered by solar energy!

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PICTURES FROM Santa Elena Canyon

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